You and the minimum wage

Did you know that employers can’t avoid paying the National Minimum Wage if it’s due by:

… saying or stating that it doesn’t apply
… making a written agreement saying someone isn’t a worker or that they’re a volunteer

That’s what the law says – it’s all in here…
https://www.gov.uk/employment-rights-for-interns

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Oh, and if you have done work for free in the past (other than work experience as part of your course) there’s a calculator here which will allow you to claim what you are owed. You can claim for all your underpayments going back over the last 6 years!
https://www.gov.uk/am-i-getting-minimum-wage

It doesn’t matter how big or small your employer was, or whether you were full or part time, or you were getting expenses, or you agreed to do it, or even if you signed a contract saying you would work for free. As long as you were entitled to the National Minimum Wage you can still get it.

Don’t believe me? Need some help? Contact Mark Watson for some confidentialfree help and advice on getting paid what you are owed.

See also How Much Should I Be Paid?

Production Management for TV and Film – Book

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“What Linda Stradling doesn’t know about production management isn’t worth knowing” The Documentary Filmmakers Group

Playing a key role in helping producers to interpret and realise the directors’ vision, production managers are responsible for all organisational aspects of TV and film production – from start to finish. Now this essential handbook tells you how it’s done. Written by highly experienced production manager and specialist tutor, Linda Stradling, this is a complete guide to the profession. It includes details on self-organisation and the best systems to use, budgets, schedules and cost control, hiring and firing, contracts, insurance, setting up a shoot, dealing with contributors, acquiring copyright, people skills and ethics. So whether you’re just starting out or want to improve your knowledge and skills, this is the book for you.

Amazon link

How to Get a Job in Television – Book

How_to_Get_a_Job_in_Television__Build_Your_Career_from_Runner_to_Series_Producer_Professional_Media_Practice__Amazon_co_uk__Elsa_Sharp__Books

TV is a notoriously difficult industry to get into and progress within. There is no set career path and 70% of applicants rely on contacts to get a foothold. Based on the author’s experience as a TV researcher, series producer and recruitment executive, this contemporary guide will help thousands of hopefuls break into TV. It is packed with inside information and advice from training bodies, HR executives, and people working in the industry at every level, including for example: Conrad Green – the multi award-winning British Executive Producer of American Idol and Dancing With the Stars (US) Tim Hincks – Chairman of Endemol (makers of Big Brother) Grant Mansfield – Chairman and MD of RDF Television Kate Phillips – Head of Development at BBC TV From the do’s and don’ts of work experience, the role of the researcher, the ‘seven stages of CV’, pathways to series producer and how to move up the ladder, this is the TV job hunter’s bible.

Amazon link

An Expert’s Guide To Getting Into TV – Book

An_Expert_s_Guide_to_Getting_into_TV_eBook__Siubhan_Richmond__Amazon_co_uk__Kindle_Store

A comprehensive and practical guide to finding work and selling yourself effectively for an entry-level job in television production. 

Written by an award-winning executive producer of many years experience, it tells it how it really is in the TV business and how to make the most of modern technology to develop your media skills. 

In a competitive job market applicants for work in the media need to use every trick in the book to get ahead. The 25,000 word guide is packed with practical techniques on selling yourself, finding the available jobs, gaining work experience and includes many links to invaluable online resources. 

It includes detailed advice on writing an effective CV along with real-life examples; how to compose a strong covering letter; what to expect at interview and advice from a range of experienced and respected media professionals. 

There is also important advice on avoiding exploitation in the work experience market; the importance of networking; what to study for a career in TV and advice on developing suitable skills. From the reality of a TV runner’s job to how to deal with periods of unemployment, it covers all areas of interest to anyone trying to get that first job in TV. 

ALL PROFITS FROM THE SALE OF THIS BOOK ARE CURRENTLY GOING TO THE GENESIS RESEARCH TRUST CHARITY. I AM RAISING FUNDS FOR THEM AS PART OF A CYCLING CHALLENGE IN AFRICA IN NOVEMBER 2014.

Amazon link

CV Writing Tips

If you are finding it difficult to write your CV for the TV/Film production industry – here are some starting tips of what to include pasted below. Downloadable pdf for your reference attached – TV CV writing tips

TV CV WRITING TIPS

This list is designed as some pointers to get you started and is in no way exhaustive.

Before you start – it is worth considering if it more useful to have a number of CVs for different job roles. Each one must be consistent in style but make easy reading for an employer in whichever industry you are working. E.g. have one as a TV Runner and another as a web designer (although in that specific instance it would be useful to list your html skills in your TV CV).

* Call your CV filename ‘ YOUR NAME – YOUR JOB TITLE – YEAR‘ so that employers can easily find you if they save it in a folder.

* Put your full name, no nicknames. Then your location (rather than your full address, it’s better for posting in social media), email and your mobile at the top (ensure your email address is appropriate and NOT sexgod69@btinternet.com or similar),

* Put your job title at the top near your name. Employers want to know what you do very quickly and will spot it straight away.

* A personal statement should be a short paragraph. 2 or 3 lines on who you are, what you do and your current skills. Genre experience is also helpful. (Learn the difference between what is a genre and what is a technical format…)

* Next do some bullet points of your key skills e.g.
• Fluent French and German language skills
• Confident shooter using [name types of camera]
• Basic FCP / digitizing
• Live Studio & O.B experience
• Archive clearance

* Now list your credits (a ‘credit’ is just something you’ve worked on, and nothing to do with an on-screen credit). Each one should have the same format and should detail the following in bold to be easily scanned by an employer:

List your credits like this, starting with the most recent:
Production Name | Prod. Co. for Broadcaster | 
Your Role
One line is sufficient to describe the programme and include the broadcaster. 2 lines description max.

* If you are relatively junior, you could briefly mention tasks that were delegated to you by a more senior person.

* Keep all your TV work together and list anything else you think could be useful in an ‘other employment’ section after your TV work if you feel this is supportive.

* If you have credits on adverts or promos – list the brands or bands

* Briefly list your education. Bullet points are best.

* Any relevant training should go last right at the bottom and you should list exactly which course you completed and the date. So find out the name and governing body of the course. First Aid, Health & Safety, Hostile Environment courses are as important as technical equipment training.

* You can list your references if you want to. Be sure to ask the person whose details you will be including BEFORE you do this. Also, if you provide them as a reference in an interview, be sure to tell them before the potential employer actually calls them!

*IMPORTANT: In consideration of new GDPR data protection regulations, Talent Managers across the industry are requesting that CVs should include a statement of consent permitting them to continue handling them in the traditional way. Without explicit permission they will not be able to pass on your CV without coming back to you for further consent. Add this or similar text to your footer:

GDPR Statement: This CV may be kept on file and distributed for employment purposes

* Your CV should be around 2 pages long. One page if you are a Runner and no more!

*Check your spelling and grammar. Do not write “drivers license”, it is incorrect. Use these words: “driving licence”.

*Do not combine your student film making experience with your professional work.

*Name your CV . Give it your name and your job title. Do not say you are a Producer or Director or Editor if you are a Runner. If you are a runner, the PM wants to see your running experience, they are not interested in your producing or directing experience.

*Always write something in the email when you send your CV in application for a job. If you can’t be bothered writing to say what job you are applying for and why, they may well not bother opening the attachment!

*Be straight. Be honest. Do not big yourself up; it will not get you the job and you will be found out!

FURTHER READING
http://youdbetterwork.com/creating-the-perfect-cv/

Creating a cover email

Becoming a runner in film and TV

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A runner is a key entry-level position into the industry. Providing on-the-job-training, a runner’s main role is to assist with the smooth running of the production office and the studio or location floor. No two days are typically the same: you can be asked to make cups of tea, photocopy scripts, call sheets, schedules and other production paperwork, go shopping for essential groceries to using email, key software such as word and excel. This means the role can be very varied and at times demanding – but it’s a great way to learn new skills and make important contacts.

Read the full article at The Production Guild
http://www.productionguild.com/training/becoming-a-runner

Employment rights and pay for interns

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This document sets out the official government position on interns

Rights to the National Minimum Wage

An intern is entitled to the National Minimum Wage if they count as a worker.

Employers can’t avoid paying the National Minimum Wage if it’s due by:

  • saying or stating that it doesn’t apply
  • making a written agreement saying someone isn’t a worker or that they’re a volunteer

Promise of future work

An intern is classed as a worker and is due the National Minimum Wage if they’re promised a contract of future work.

 

https://www.gov.uk/employment-rights-for-interns

 

What is the seven day rule?

This is a special exemption, just for film and TV, which allows people who would normally be PAYE to be paid gross. The company still has to pay the National Insurance though.

2.3 THE “SEVEN DAY” RULE 
Because many employed workers in the Film, Production & TV Broadcasting industry have short engagements with a succession of different employers, the normal operation of PAYE is impractical and would in many cases result in excessive deductions of tax. The Seven-Day Rule is intended to alleviate the hardship, which might arise from such excessive deductions.

You need not apply PAYE to payments made to workers engaged for less than one week – that is, for six consecutive days or less.

The period of six consecutive days includes rest days and weekends if these fall between the first and last days of engagement. For example, if a worker is engaged for
Wednesday, Thursday and Friday and for the following Monday and Tuesday, the intervening weekend must be counted and the limit of six days will be exceeded.

Here’s the most recent copy of the guidance document issued by HMRC fi-notes-2012